New Year, New Specials

For the new year, I’m updating two regular specials, and one Yelp Deal.

The regular specials will be for up to two visits for new clients only: either $45 for a one hour massage (regular price $75) or $65 for a 90-minute massage (regular price $95). Feel free to take advantage of one of each to see which works best for you, or if you know you prefer either a one hour or a 90-minute massage, feel free to get 2 of either one. No matter how you choose to use it, you’ll get a $30 discount per massage for a total $60 discount.

The Yelp Deal is $75 for a 90-minute massage and is open to all customers for the duration of the deal without restriction. Visit my Yelp business page to purchase the deal on Yelp, or request the Yelp special when you call to make your appointment.

Feel free to call or email to schedule. I’ve also posted my Google calendar below the fold so you can see my availability. Mondays-Thursdays, same day appointments are frequently available with an hour or two notice (call to schedule).
415-647-2829
foryourmindandbody@yahoo.com or
4bodyandmind@gmail.com Continue reading “New Year, New Specials”

Changes

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a while, but have been waiting for some work-related changes to settle in. The short version is that I’m now working two new places in addition to my private home practice.


On March 6th, I had my first massage shift at UCSF’s Bakar Fitness & Recreation Center at Mission Bay. This is great for anyone who would prefer to see me in an office location rather than in my home office. I currently have regular shifts on Saturday’s from 2:30 to 7:30pm, Sunday’s from 9:00am to 2:00pm, and a sub shift Tuesday’s from 4:00 to 9:00pm (beginning April 6th). Gym members and UCSF students & staff may schedule online via the UCSF Fitness & Recreation Center website. Non-members may schedule by calling the Service Desk at (415) 514-4545.

UCSF Bakar Fitness & Recreation Center
1675 Owens Street San Francisco, CA 94158

Pricing

Individual Services
30 minute 60 minute 90 minute
UCSF Students/Members
$34 $64 $90
Non-member UCSF Employee
$38 $72 $102
Non-member General Public
$45 $85 $120

Packages (purchase multiple packages and save)

3-Pack 60 minute 3-Pack 90 minute
UCSF Students/Members
$185 $257
Non-member UCSF Employee
$210 $291
Non-member General Public
$246 $342


On February18th, I began doing seated massage with On the Spot Massage at Whole Foods SoMa location in San Francisco. This is a great way for people to get a massage as a tune-up or a quick therapeutic treatment. I’m available Thursdays from 3:30 to 8:00pm. Appointments are on a walk-in basis only.

Whole Foods Market, SoMa
399 4th Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
Seated Massage Rates

5 Minute Tune-Up
$5
10 Minutes
$15
15 Minutes
$20
20 Minutes
$25
25 Minutes
$30
30 Minutes

$35

I’m continuing to test Practice Fusion‘s Electronic Health Record system as well as their Personal Health Record. I originally posted separately about that here. Having two new practice locations does change how I can implement it, not because of anything regarding the record system, but rather due to how things work at UCSF and with On the Spot Massage. If you’re interested in testing this EHR & PHR system with me in my private practice, sign up with me for 10 sessions of either 60 or 90 minutes each. I’ll discount these sessions as a package to $600 or $750 respectively, which can be paid in three installments of $200 or $250.


Finally, if you haven’t read my post on changes associated with the Chinese New Year back in February, take a moment to look at it. I think it’s a fun perspective on these changes in my professional life as well as on some on some of the volatility I’ve seen in events and the lives of people around me.


Rethinking Massage

From Barbara Brody, Women’s Day Health Editor, in Daily Dose April 24th

When I got a massage for the first time about a decade ago, I was under the impression that it was something you did to pamper yourself when you had a little extra cash to burn (or better yet, a gift certificate). Now I’m beginning to think it’s a medical necessity.

Medical necessity might be a little strong, but as a massage therapist I certainly agree with the sentiment, especially with regard to health maintenance. Her post is short, but perhaps you’ll find some of your own issues reflected in what she writes.